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Object sorting | Antwerp | Belgium

In the centre of Antwerp, the second largest city of Belgium, near Richard Rogers' famous palace of justice, another eye-catcher has been established since 2016. The architects of Rau and Stramien designed the catholic university “Karel de Grote”. They created accents on the façade by combining Feldhaus thin bricks with other materials such as aluminium and wood.

The seven different thin brick varieties R764DF, R734DF, R773DF, R757DF, R742DF, R733DF and R561DF were processed partially by mixing them. The laying technique is a particular highlight: Six types of thin bricks were glued vertically without joint. The thin brick R561DF14 was horizontally processed next to the windows. The Belgian company Heylen Ceramics was responsible for tendering and technical support. The result is unique and makes the city of Antwerp even more beautiful.